FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES

We have a range of different fresh fruits grown locally and imported.
We have apples, oranges, grapes, pears, bananas, pineapples, plums, kiwi, lemons, limes, avocado, grapefruit and much more fresh fruits to offer.

GRAPES

 

Prime Seedless

This is the earliest white seedless variety, and was developed and patented in South Africa. The medium sized berries are rounded and bunches are well filled out without being compact.

The Volcani Institute receives royalties on both on the initial purchase of the vine and per carton harvested once the vines start to produce, and despite this, Prime is becoming a very popular variety as it ripens before all the other white seedless cultivars, and its early entrance into the market holds the promise of premium returns to growers.


Thompson Seedless / Sultana

Also known as SUPERIOR SEEDLESS ®. Sugraone has bright green, elongated berries, and a subtle sweet muscat flavor with a distinctive crunch. The loose bunches; excellent eating quality and good shelf life have made this one of the world's most popular varieties.

Sugraone was discovered in California as an unknown seedling, and was further developed and patented by Sun World. Sun World protects its intellectual rights to the products that have been developed by them by issuing marketing and nursery licenses to selected institutions internationally.


Sugraone

Also known as SUPERIOR SEEDLESS ®. Sugraone has bright green, elongated berries, and a subtle sweet muscat flavor with a distinctive crunch. The loose bunches; excellent eating quality and good shelf life have made this one of the world's most popular varieties.

Sugraone was discovered in California as an unknown seedling, and was further developed and patented by Sun World. Sun World protects its intellectual rights to the products that have been developed by them by issuing marketing and nursery licenses to selected institutions internationally.


Regal

This early white seedless variety was formerly known as Regent seedless, and has attractive oval berries, with loose bunches and a good shelf life.

It was developed and patented at Nietvoorbij in the Western Cape, and generally ripens a few days before Thompson's seedless.


Sundance Seedless

Sundance Seedless is the latest white seedless grape available in South Africa, and is usually harvested from harvest week 6-8. The skin is thick, but eats well, giving the cultivar a unique ability to be stored for up to 3 months.

The variety was bread by ARC\Nietvoorbij during the early 90’s.

Flame Seedless

This is the earliest red seedless variety, and is a cross between Cardinal, Sultana, Malaga and Hanepoot. Flame Seedless was released in California in 1973. The small, rounded berries have an appealing red colour and are very tasty.

It has loose bunches and a limited shelf life.

This variety is well suited to cultivation in arid climates and is extensively cultivated in South Africa's Orange River production region. Flame Seedless is generally harvested a week of two before Sultana.

Sunred Seedless

Sunred Seedless was developed at ARC-Infruitec, Stellenbosch, South Africa, and originated from a cross between Datal and Ruby Seedless.

This red grape is a mid season variety, ripening in mid February. It has medium-sized, oval berries, with compact bunches.

Crimson Seedless

This is a mid to late season red variety with relatively small oval berries and loose bunches. Crimson is harvested in March, and is characterized by its crisp texture and intense sweet flavour.

It keeps well on the vine, and also has a very good shelf life. Crimson seedless was developed in California by D Ramming.

Clementine

There are two theories about the origin of this fruit. Some claim that the Clementine originated in Oran, Algeria, and that it was as a result of accidental cross between the common Mediterranean mandarin with pollen from an ornamental sour orange known as Granito but most believe its origins lie in the Chinese provinces of Gwangxi and Guangdong, as it is extremely similar to the Canton mandarin that has its origins here.

The Clementine is almost completely seedless. It is easy to peel and segment. Skin colour is bright orange. Clementines have become the most popular and widely cultivated mandarin in the Mediterranean growing regions.

Satsumas

Satsuma's originated in Japan in the mid 16th century, or possibly even earlier and in Japan they are also known as Unshiu mikan. Satsumas are easy peelers that are totally seedless and have a good eating quality. The skin colour tends to be green in the early season requiring degreening.

Until the early 1980's Satsuma's were grown principally in Japan and Spain. However, this position has changed considerably, and South Africa now also produces a considerable volume of Satsumas. Of all mandarins, none has more exceptional cold-hardiness than the Satsuma.

Novas

Nova originated in Florida in 1942 from as a hybrid from a crossing between a Fina clementine and an Orlando tangelo. It was officially released in 1964. The fruit is medium to large in size. The fruit is medium to large in size, the rind is a reddish-orange and the flesh deep orange in colour.

The segments are juicy, tender and sweet. In South Africa it is harvested from end April to the end of May/beginning July. It has been planted on a modest scale recently in Cape Province.

Minneolas

Minneolas originated in Florida in 1931, from a cross that was developed by the US Department of Agriculture. The fruit has a deep orange colour and is a hybrid of a grapefruit and a tangerine.

Minneolas have found a niche in the variety composition of many of the world's leading citrus-producing industries. It is harvested mid May to end June (hot areas) and mid June to end July (cool, inland areas).

The shape is round, with most fruits having a pronounced and distinctive neck, which leads to its immediate recognition by consumers. The rind has not only exceptional color, being reddish-orange, but also has a particularly fine, smooth texture. The tree and fruit are particularly susceptible to alternaria brown spot (Altinaria citri), which has caused plantings to decline in South Africa's affected areas

Tambors

The tambor (or Ortanique) originated from a natural hybrid found in Jamaica, and was first propagated in 1920. The fruit is medium size, and slightly flattened at the stylar-end where a small navel is often formed.

The flesh is extremely juicy and has a high sugar content, and the general appearance of the fruit is greatly affected by the area in which the fruit is produced. Until the early 1970's production was very limited and restricted to Jamaica, but tambors have shown good adaptability to less tropical climates, and are now grown in Honduras, Cyprus, Israel, Swaziland and South Africa.

Ellendales

Ellendales were discovered as a chance seedling near Bundaberg in Queensland, Australia as early as 1878, and although they appear to be an orange–mandarin hybrid their true origins are unknown.

The fruit is medium to large, sometimes very large, usually flattened in shape and is regarded as being a midseason maturing variety in Queensland. Although the colour tends to develop slowly, the rind eventually develops a good deep orange colour.

Rind texture is smooth on all except extra-large fruit and, although thin, sometimes extremely thin, is easily removed without releasing much rind oil. It does not develop puffiness when left to hang on the tree.

CITRUS

 

Clementine

There are two theories about the origin of this fruit. Some claim that the Clementine originated in Oran, Algeria, and that it was as a result of accidental cross between the common Mediterranean mandarin with pollen from an ornamental sour orange known as Granito but most believe its origins lie in the Chinese provinces of Gwangxi and Guangdong, as it is extremely similar to the Canton mandarin that has its origins here.

The Clementine is almost completely seedless. It is easy to peel and segment. Skin colour is bright orange. Clementines have become the most popular and widely cultivated mandarin in the Mediterranean growing regions.

Satsumas

Satsuma's originated in Japan in the mid 16th century, or possibly even earlier and in Japan they are also known as Unshiu mikan. Satsumas are easy peelers that are totally seedless and have a good eating quality. The skin colour tends to be green in the early season requiring degreening.

Until the early 1980's Satsuma's were grown principally in Japan and Spain. However, this position has changed considerably, and South Africa now also produces a considerable volume of Satsumas. Of all mandarins, none has more exceptional cold-hardiness than the Satsuma.

Novas

Nova originated in Florida in 1942 from as a hybrid from a crossing between a Fina clementine and an Orlando tangelo. It was officially released in 1964. The fruit is medium to large in size. The fruit is medium to large in size, the rind is a reddish-orange and the flesh deep orange in colour.

The segments are juicy, tender and sweet. In South Africa it is harvested from end April to the end of May/beginning July. It has been planted on a modest scale recently in Cape Province.

Minneolas

Minneolas originated in Florida in 1931, from a cross that was developed by the US Department of Agriculture. The fruit has a deep orange colour and is a hybrid of a grapefruit and a tangerine.

Minneolas have found a niche in the variety composition of many of the world's leading citrus-producing industries. It is harvested mid May to end June (hot areas) and mid June to end July (cool, inland areas).

The shape is round, with most fruits having a pronounced and distinctive neck, which leads to its immediate recognition by consumers. The rind has not only exceptional color, being reddish-orange, but also has a particularly fine, smooth texture. The tree and fruit are particularly susceptible to alternaria brown spot (Altinaria citri), which has caused plantings to decline in South Africa's affected areas

Tambors

The tambor (or Ortanique) originated from a natural hybrid found in Jamaica, and was first propagated in 1920. The fruit is medium size, and slightly flattened at the stylar-end where a small navel is often formed.

The flesh is extremely juicy and has a high sugar content, and the general appearance of the fruit is greatly affected by the area in which the fruit is produced. Until the early 1970's production was very limited and restricted to Jamaica, but tambors have shown good adaptability to less tropical climates, and are now grown in Honduras, Cyprus, Israel, Swaziland and South Africa.

Ellendales

Ellendales were discovered as a chance seedling near Bundaberg in Queensland, Australia as early as 1878, and although they appear to be an orange–mandarin hybrid their true origins are unknown.

The fruit is medium to large, sometimes very large, usually flattened in shape and is regarded as being a midseason maturing variety in Queensland. Although the colour tends to develop slowly, the rind eventually develops a good deep orange colour.

Rind texture is smooth on all except extra-large fruit and, although thin, sometimes extremely thin, is easily removed without releasing much rind oil. It does not develop puffiness when left to hang on the tree.

FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH BANANA
FRESH APPLE
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES
FRESH APPLE
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES

Eureka

Eureka is the most widely cultivated lemon variety, and makes up the bulk of the lemon crops from Australia, South Africa, California and Argentina and Israel.

The variety originated in California in 1858, grown from seeds imported from Sicily. Eureka fruit is somewhat smaller than the other important lemon varieties, Lisbon and Verna. Being smaller, it is often less productive than Lisbon but has a well-distributed harvest season through late winter, spring and early summer.

Although the rind is smooth when grown in many locations, in Spain and in other areas with similar climatic conditions it may be coarser. Rind thickness is thus generally medium to thin, and the fruit has a high juice content with a high acid level.

Seeds are few, rarely more than five, and often the fruit is seedless. Eureka is also markedly less cold-resistant than Lisbon, it is well adapted to the coastal areas where frost damage is more rarely experienced.

Lisbon

Lisbon lemons originated in Australia, grown from seed exported from Portugal in the early 19th century. It only became popular in California in the late 19th century, following introductions in the 1870's. Today Lisbon is widely grown in the USA (California, and Arizona), Australia, Uruguay and Argentina.

Lisbon has a somewhat less pronounced nipple and slightly rougher rind texture than Eureka. Production is restricted mainly to winter and early spring, and Lisbon is more cold resistant than Eureka. It is also more productive, and will often out yield Eureka by as much as 25 per cent. When marketed from California, no distinction is made between these two varieties (Lisbon and Eureka).


Fino

The true origins of Fino are unknown, but it is possible that they originated from the old Spanish variety Comun de la Vega Alta del Rio Segura.

Fino has regular-shaped small fruit that is spherical to oval. It has a smooth thin rind and a relatively short nipple, and also has a high juice content. The Fino harvest extends from late summer into mid winter.
FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES

APPLES

Braeburn

Braeburn originated in New Zealand from a chance seedling in 1950. It was first imported into South Africa in the mid seventies. Braeburn is harvested from late March to early April. The fruit has a similar shape to Granny Smith, and the background colour is green-gold and covered with a partial reddish-orange blush or stripes.

The texture is crisp and the taste is sweet and slightly tangy. It is an excellent eating apple and is delicious in salads.


Fuji

Fuji originated in the 1950's in Fujisaki, Japan and is a cross between Ralls and Red Delicious. It was introduced to South Africa in the early 1990's. Fuji is harvested in early April.

Fuji is a relatively large apple, and has a green-yellow background, partially covered with bright pink-red stripes. The flesh is yellowish and the texture is firm and very crisp, juicy apple, very sweet with an attractive aroma.


Gala

This apple was bred in New Zealand and is a cross between Kid's Orange Pippin and Golden Delicious. It was imported into South Africa in the 1970's and the first commercial plantings took place in 1982.

Gala is harvested in mid February.

It has a yellow skin, with some red stripes and inconspicuous lenticels, and slight russeting often occurs at the stem-end. The flesh is cream and the texture is crisp and the fruit is inclined to be small.

The apple has a unique, sweet, tangy flavour and a lovely aroma. Gala is a perfect eating apple and ideal for salads.

Golden Delicious

Golden Delicious was found as a seedling in West Virginia, USA, in the 1880's and introduced into South Africa in 1930 by Molteno Brothers of Grabouw. Golden delicious is harvested from late February to mid March. It is a medium to large apple, green when harvested, ripening to a golden yellow colour.

The skin has conspicuous lenticels. The flesh is green-white and crisp and the taste is sweet, fragrant and juicy. It is a superb eating apple, and is excellent for use in salads. In certain areas and under specific climatic conditions Golden Delicious has a delicate pink blush.

Sundowner

Sundowner is the lesser-known sibling of Pink Lady. They share the same parentage - Golden Delicious and Lady Williams - but they were developed at the same time by the same fruit breeder, John Cripps of Western Australia. Pink Lady and Sundowner are trade names, and you will also see these apples described and sometimes marketed as Cripps Pink and Cripps Red respectively.

Sundowner does not have the distinctive pink blush of Pink Lady, being a more conventional "bi-coloured" red apple. The flavour is less delicate than Pink Lady, and slightly more distinctive.

Granny Smith

Granny Smith derives its name from a real granny Smith, Mrs Maria Ann Smith, who discovered this seedling in her garden in Australia in the 1860's.

The first plantings in South Africa date back to 1919. Granny Smith is in full bloom from middle to late October and is harvested from late March to late April.

It is a medium to large apple, varying in colour from light to bright green, and the lenticels are well developed. In cooler areas it will develop a red blush.

The flesh is firm, white and crisp, and the taste is slightly tart, yet sweet. It is an excellent eating apple and good for baking, sauces or purees.


Royal Gala

This apple originated in New Zealand and is a Gala mutation. It was introduced to South Africa in the 1980's and is now preferred to the Gala because of its better colour.

Royal Gala is harvested in mid February and the same size and taste is identical to Gala, but it is covered with stripes, bright red in colour. When ripe the background skin is yellow and with the deep red stripes, and Royal Gala has a beautiful deep orange appearance.


Starking

Starking originated in the USA in the 1920's and was introduced to South Africa in the 1940's. It is a mutation of Red Delicious, and is harvested in early March.

It is a medium to large apple with red stripes on a green-yellow background. Starking is a very popular eating apple. It is sweet and juicy, has cream coloured flesh and a crisp texture.

Topred

This apple was discovered in the 1950's in Columbia, USA. It is a mutation of Shotwell Delicious, which was itself a mutation of Red Delicious. It was introduced to South Africa in 1973.

Topred is harvested from late February to early March, and has a deep red colour, more uniform that a Starking and with conspicuous lenticels. It is a medium to large fruit, with creamy-white flesh and a crisp texture. The taste is sweet and juicy and delicious to eat.

Pink Lady ® / Cripp's Pink

This delicious bicolour apple has one pink cheek and one pale cheek and was developed in West Australia by John Cripps of the Australian Department of Agriculture. Cripp's Pink is a cross breeding of Golden Delicious and Lady Williams, and is harvested in mid to late April.

The skin is pink to light red solid blush overlaying a lime yellow background, it has creamy white flesh, a crisp, fine texture, and a sweet-tart flavour. Pink Lady ® is not a variety, but a brand name. The brand is applied to the Cripp's Pink variety of apples only if they comply with the stringent quality standards prescribed by the Pink Lady ® brand.

Beurre Bosc

Beurre Bosc originated in France as a chance seedling, and it is not known when it was brought into South Africa. Beurre Bosc is harvested from late January to early February.

Beurre Bosc is a medium to large, rough-skinned pear with a distinctive symmetrical shape, a long thin tapering neck and slim stem.

The skin is yellowish-green to brown when ripe. The flesh is cream coloured and firm and the texture is slightly coarse, but tender, and the taste is aromatic, sweet and juicy.


Bon Chretien

Bon Chretien originated in the United Kingdom, and is also known as a Bartlett of William's pear in other countries. Bon Chretien is harvested from early to late January.

It is a bell-shaped pear and the skin is green-yellow with conspicuous green lenticels when picked. As the pear ripens, the skin turns yellow and the lenticels become brown. The flesh is creamy-white in colour and the texture is smooth and fine. The taste is fragrant, sweet and juicy. Bon Chretien is both an excellent eating and popular canning pear.


Forelle

Forelle originated in Germany as a chance seedling and was introduced to South Africa in the late 1800's. It is believed that the name Forelle originates from the rainbow trout of the same name, because the special colour and markings on the pear are similar to that on the trout.

Forelle is harvested from late February to late March. It is an oblong of bell-shaped pear. It is attractive, being highly coloured.

As it ripens the background colour changes from green-yellow to golden-yellow with a brilliant red contrasting blush. The skin is marked by conspicuous lenticels appearing as spots. The flesh is creamy-white in colour and the texture is slightly coarse, and the flesh is sweet and juicy.

Packham's Triumph

Packham's Triumph originated in Australia in the 1890's. It is a cross between Bon Chretien and St Germain, and was introduced into South Africa in 1922.

This pear is harvested in mid February. It is a medium to large, unevenly shaped, light-green pear with conspicuous dark-green lenticels, and the skin colour remains green-yellow when ripe. The flesh is creamy-white with a fine, smooth texture, and the taste is sweet and juicy..


Pink Lady ® / Cripp's Pink

This delicious bicolour apple has one pink cheek and one pale cheek and was developed in West Australia by John Cripps of the Australian Department of Agriculture. Cripp's Pink is a cross breeding of Golden Delicious and Lady Williams, and is harvested in mid to late April.

The skin is pink to light red solid blush overlaying a lime yellow background, it has creamy white flesh, a crisp, fine texture, and a sweet-tart flavour. Pink Lady ® is not a variety, but a brand name. The brand is applied to the Cripp's Pink variety of apples only if they comply with the stringent quality standards prescribed by the Pink Lady ® brand.